Stop Thinking Small

 

Remember when you were in elementary school and your teacher posed the question, “What do you want to be when you grow up?” On blank sheets of paper, you and your classmates vigorously listed endless career options to paint your bright futures ahead. When it was time to share, no one told 5-year-old Lisa that becoming an astronaut princess was a hoax of a career goal or your best friend Mark that his chances of becoming an NBA player were slim to none. Back then, possibilities were endless, the belief was abundant, and nothing was impossible. 

 

Then we grew up.

 

It seems like the older we get the less we believe in our abilities to accomplish whatever we put our minds to. We start playing it safe. Our dreams become practical and we sacrifice our passions for 9-5 minimum wage jobs because we are too afraid to look over the other side of fear. Millions of people admit that their worst fear is dying but by the looks of the way a majority of us are existing it seems like we are actually afraid to live. If you or someone you know is a victim to this pattern of thinking Brock Laramee has something to tell you: 

 

There is no reward for playing it safe.

 

There is no benefit to limiting your capabilities. 

 

The world deserves to see you at your full potential. 

 

 

Brock believes that the answers for which you seek are already within you. By trusting your instincts and succumbing to that gut feeling that gnaws on your soul, he knows that you can reach your full potential.

 

But, if it was that easy you wouldn’t be here, would you? 

 

Although you want to change there is something holding you back. Whether it’s your fear of failure, childhood insecurities, or lack of self-trust, Brock thinks it’s time to let it go. Every excuse is just another way of saying, “I’m afraid to reach my full potential because if I do it means that my worst enemy was staring back at me in the mirror this entire time.” Brock knows that pursuing your dreams can be intimidating. He knows that there are so many reasons why you shouldn’t think big. 

 

But guess what? 

 

He wants you to do it anyways.  

 

Despite popular belief, there is not a subset of the population that was dubbed to be excellent from birth. Yes, it can be argued that some people just “luck out” by being born into extreme wealth and healthy family dynamics, but a majority of the people we look up to were just ordinary people willing to go the extra mile. Because we had creators, originators, and innovators who did not give up we are blessed to have pivotal monuments such as the Beetles, the Huffington Post, or even the light bulb. 

 

Can you imagine music without the impact of the Beetles?

 

Or news literature without the trailblazing Arianna Huffington?

 

Is it possible for us to even think about a world where we would have to light a lantern to go downstairs to grab a midnight snack?

 

 

When you research the most lucrative rock bands of all time it’s almost impossible to not stumble across the Beetles. Known as the “Fab Four”, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr sold 1.6 billion singles in the United States and 178 million albums worldwide. So many people talk about their success and the tremendous impact they had on the music industry. You know what people don’t talk about? The members of this infamous group before fame. According to Inc, the beginning of this groups career was riddled with failures that would have made most bands quit. For instance, when the Beetles went to audition for Decca Records at Decca Studios in West Hampstead not only was their line up incomplete since they had yet to add on Ringo Starr, but their music was not impressive. Ultimately, they were rejected by the label who ended up going with the group Brian Poole and the Tremeloes?

 

Have you ever heard of Brian Poole and the Tremeloes? No, yeah that’s what I thought.

 

Instead of giving up at that moment the band took this rejection as motivation to work harder for their goals. While they got a no that time, after on they stole the world’s hearts with their hit single “Hey Jude” and accumulated a net worth of 3 billion. 

 

In addition, before the fame, the Stylist reports that when literary mogul Arianna Huffington was in her 20’s her second book was rejected by 36 publishers. 36 publishers told the Arianna Huffington who is arguably the most important woman in the news business no.  Did that stop her? Of course not. After briefly considering a career change she picked herself up and swallowed her pride heading to the bank to ask for a loan and kept chugging along. A large part of what encouraged her to keep going was her mother’s advice which states that “Failure is not the opposite of success it’s the stepping stone to success.” She is now worth 50 million dollars and has written 15 impressive books. 

 

There is no telling where she would have ended up if she didn’t trust her gut and kept running towards the direction of her goals.

 

Finally, before you continue Brock wants you to get up and flip-up any light switch around you. Notice that a simple flick of the wrist led to a whole section of the space around you being illuminated. The Napoleon Hill Foundation states that Thomas Edison failed 10,00 times before finally crafting his invention that lit the world and helped initiate a billion-dollar industry. 

 

Moral of the story: It’s time for you to wake up. Brock needs you to understand that: 

 

You are CAPABLE of reaching your goals

 

You are EXCEPTIONAL

 

You have MAGNIFICENT GIFTS to offer the world  

 

Remember, ordinary people, accomplish amazing things every day. Trust your gut and watch the doors of opportunity fly open. 

 

Sincerely, 

 

The Brock Laramee Development Team

 

 

 

 

Sources:

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